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Consultee Contact

Midwest Psychiatric Center, Inc. is a private psychiatric practice owned by my colleague, Dr. Rakesh Kaneria.  I provide therapy to adults and a small number of children/adolescents at this location.  We can accept most commercial insurances, as well as Caresource (of Ohio Medicaid) and Medicare.  Adult clients who work with me at MPC also have the option to see Dr. Kaneria for evaluation and medication management if desired or needed.  Child psychiatric evaluation and medication management are not available with MPC.    We are located in West Chester, OH near the UC West Chester Hospital, just off I-75, between Liberty Way. and Tylersville Rd.

Call us:
1-513-217-5221

Send a message: Contact Us

General Questions

What is the difference between a therapist and psychiatrist?

The quick answer is that a psychiatrist is a physician (MD or DO) and a therapist is not.  Most psychiatrists today focus on the medical aspects of mental health, so the primary intervention one receives from a psychiatrist is prescription medications.  Psychiatrists may dabble in psychotherapy, will be familiar with various therapeutic interventions, and refer their patients for therapy, however most therapists are NOT psychiatrists these days.

A psychotherapist (“therapist” for short) is a professional who is trained and licensed by the state to provide psychotherapy.  A therapist may have studied clinical social work, psychology, or counseling, and he or she will have at least a master’s degree or higher.  You will see credentials like LISW, PsyD, PhD, and PCC after a therapist’s name indicating their field of training.   Each field of training has its own focuses and nuances.  Generally speaking, therapists are not licensed to prescribe medications.

I am an LISW, licensed independent social worker.

What is an LISW?

LISW stands for “Licensed Independent Social Worker.”  It is the credential used by the state of Ohio to identify a professional who has achieved a Masters in Social Work (MSW), passed the state licensing exam, and has completed at least two years of supervised post-masters practice.

Central to the social work profession is the idea of “the person in the environment.”  This means that social workers take a holistic approach to understanding the individuals they serve, taking into account history, culture, religion, education, home and community environments, etc.  We attempt to respectfully meet the person where they are at, free of judgment.  The six core values of the social work profession are: service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence.

What is the difference between Counseling, Psychotherapy, and Life Coaching?

All three of these terms can be used to describe the same type of intervention, but not necessarily, so you will want to clarify this with the professional.  “Counseling” can apply to a guidance counselor at a school, camp counselor, clergy member or minister, or a Professional Counselor.  All can do wonderful things to help people improve their lives, but not all “counseling” is necessarily mental health counseling.  Depending on the type of counseling, it may or may not be covered by insurance.

“Life Coaching” is a relatively new term used to describe the services of a professional who encourages clients on matters related to careers, personal goals, and individual challenges.  Life coaching is generally not covered by insurance.

“Psychotherapy” is a term used to describe mental health counseling.   It can include a number of treatment methods to help address a variety of mental health disorders, relieve symptoms, and improve quality of life.  It must be provided by a licensed professional.  Psychotherapy is generally covered by most insurance plans.   Therapy is about mobilizing our strengths to create positive changes in our lives.  We all have areas of our lives that are stressful, confusing, or difficult.  We also all have strengths, capabilities, knowledge, and insight.  People who come to therapy often experience:

  • A better understanding of themselves
  • Stronger and deeper relationships
  • Improved health and wellness
  • Less anxiety and depression
  • A better quality of life
  • Rejuvenating sleep
  • Relief from physical and emotional pain

What is the difference between Counseling, Psychotherapy, and Life Coaching?

All three of these terms can be used to describe the same type of intervention, but not necessarily, so you will want to clarify this with the professional.  “Counseling” can apply to a guidance counselor at a school, camp counselor, clergy member or minister, or a Professional Counselor.  All can do wonderful things to help people improve their lives, but not all “counseling” is necessarily mental health counseling.  Depending on the type of counseling, it may or may not be covered by insurance.

“Life Coaching” is a relatively new term used to describe the services of a professional who encourages clients on matters related to careers, personal goals, and individual challenges.  Life coaching is generally not covered by insurance.

“Psychotherapy” is a term used to describe mental health counseling.   It can include a number of treatment methods to help address a variety of mental health disorders, relieve symptoms, and improve quality of life.  It must be provided by a licensed professional.  Psychotherapy is generally covered by most insurance plans.   Therapy is about mobilizing our strengths to create positive changes in our lives.  We all have areas of our lives that are stressful, confusing, or difficult.  We also all have strengths, capabilities, knowledge, and insight.  People who come to therapy often experience:

  • A better understanding of themselves
  • Stronger and deeper relationships
  • Improved health and wellness
  • Less anxiety and depression
  • A better quality of life
  • Rejuvenating sleep
  • Relief from physical and emotional pain

Practice Specific Questions

Do you accept insurance? What if I don’t have insurance?

Midwest Psychiatric Center accepts most private insurances, as well as Caresource (of Ohio Medicaid), Medicare, and self-pay.  Clients who do not have insurance my choose self-pay and may be eligible for a reduced rate according to a sliding-scale based on income (arranged on an individual basis).

What are your office hours?

Generally I work 9am to 5pm, however I often make special arrangements to accommodate work and school schedules.  I also work outside the office from time to time, so I may be available for phone support even if I am not physically in the office.  Always contact the office directly if you need to reach me.  If you’re concerned about availability for appointments, please let me know.

Where is your office located? What is your contact information?

Midwest Psychiatric Center, Inc. is located in West Chester, OH near the UC West Chester Hospital, just off I-75, between Liberty Way and Tylersville Rd.   We’re across from Voice of America Park.

The address is 7760 W. VOA Park Drive, Suite G, West Chester OH 45069. Phone: 513-217-5221.  Fax 513-217-6221.

Services

What services do you provide and with what ages do you work?

I provide individual psychotherapy to adults.  I am licensed to treat children and adolescents, as well as group psychotherapy.  Currently I a carry a small number of child/adolescent clients, though acceptance of referral is based on level of care needs.  A screening process is completed to determine if I am equipped to meet a child’s needs at this office.  If more intensive or comprehensive services are need (e.g. case management, family therapy, child psychiatry), I will offer you suggestions of alternative providers.  In addition to general psychotherapy, I am also certified to provide trauma specific interventions.

Do you offer couples and family therapy?

Currently I do not offer ongoing couples and/or family therapy.  I do however integrate couples interventions into individual treatment plans as needed, all billed under and to the benefit of the index client.  If you have questions about couples interventions, I recommend we discuss them individually to be certain you access the exact service you are seeking.

Do you offer EMDR Therapy?

Yes!  I am very proud to offer EMDR to my clients.  “EMDR” stands for “Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing.”  It is a unique form of psychotherapy that has been heavily researched since its initial development in 1989 and is now endorsed by organizations such as the American Psychiatric Association, the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and many other international health agencies. If you are interested in EMDR, please click HERE for additional information.

How do I know if therapy is working?

Therapy is working when you begin to feel better!  That’s the simple answer.  More specifically, it means that you have begun to experience relief and feel you are achieving your goals.  When you begin therapy, I will guide you in identifying specifically what your goals are.  They should be concrete and measurable, so we will know if you’re getting the results you want.  We can also use some clinical tools (questionnaires, surveys, screenings) to track your symptoms.

“Feeling better” can mean a lot of different things to people, so we will discuss your definition and make sure you and I are on the same page – as well as making sure we both have realistic expectations.

What if I don’t like what’s happening in therapy?

If therapy is not helping you achieve your goals, not bringing you relief, or is upsetting you, TELL YOUR THERAPIST!  It’s good to have a conversation about the problem, rather than to just quit coming.  More often than not, simple adjustments can be made to improve your experience in therapy.  However, not every therapist is a good match for every client.  You may need to seek referral to someone new, and that’s perfectly acceptable.  The important thing is that you get the help you need!

Does therapy always feel good?

Generally speaking, therapy should always be a positive and productive experience, but that does not mean is always gives us the warm fuzzies.  It’s not unheard of to have sessions that are emotionally draining or challenging, especially if you’re working on big things in your life or making major changes.  Sometimes the draining or challenging sessions end up being the most fruitful, though.  There will be sessions that you walk away from with a stronger sense of calm or hopefulness, or new ideas or insights.

I am committed to working with my client’s collaboratively to set a pace that is comfortable but productive.  We’ll work together to makes decisions about what to work on, when, and for how long.

Feeling nervous about therapy?

I’m worried my work, family, friends, etc. will know I’m in therapy. What should I do?

All licensed therapists are bound to HIPAA regulations, just as other health care providers are.  In fact, there are additional regulations to protect psychotherapy records, as they may often contain deeply personal information.  The general rule of thumb is that none of your protected health information can be shared with ANYONE without your written consent.  The only exception is in the case of danger to self or others.  Therapists are mandated reporters, which means that they are bound to intervene to keep individuals and community as safe as possible.  Even if I make a report to the police, child protective services, adult protective services, or refer to a crisis intervention program, I will do my best to do so with your knowledge.

If you are very concerned about keeping your therapy private, let me know.  We can work to make arrangements to be discrete.  For example, you may want to show up for your appointment EXACTLY on time, rather than wait in the waiting room.  I can contact you only at certain phone numbers if you prefer.

How do I know what to say in my first session?

Don’t worry about that!  That’s my job!  I will help you sort through your thoughts, feelings, and circumstances so we can find a starting point.  You can read more about the first session at the “Beginning Therapy” tab above.

What if I’m not ready to talk about everything?

That’s okay!  Your story is your story.  You do not have to tell me anything you don’t want to.  However, the more honest, direct, and forthcoming you are, the more helpful therapy will be for you.  I am not here to judge or criticize.  I am honored to hear my clients’ stories and help them find healing and peace.  Let me know if you’re afraid to talk about something, because we can probably find a creative solution to help you feel more comfortable.

I’m not sure I’m ready to take the leap into therapy yet. How can I learn more before I make my decision?

“The Consumer’s Guide to Psychotherapy” by Engler and Goleman is a useful reference, and there are other similar titles you might find helpful.  You may also want to read the websites of other therapists to see how they compare.  Another option is to schedule a consultation to meet with me (or another therapist of your choice) to explore your questions, qualms, fears, or doubts about therapy.

On a more personal level, you might discuss the idea with family or friends who you trust and whose opinions you value.  See what they think about the idea.  Your primary care physician or other medical provider may also have some insight for you as well.